Tinker, tailor, wrestler or pirate?

 

 

“The farther we’ve gotten from the magic and mystery of our past, the more we’ve come to need Halloween.” -October Dreams” ― Paula Curan.

A N  E Q U A L  O P P O R T U N I T Y  E V E N T ?

This week’s Word Challenge on Susan and my alternate site Weekly Prompts is HALLOWEEN in which we ask  you the following question: can a girl go out trick-or-treating disguised as a pirate instead of the traditional princess, nurse or school teacher?

This is really not a trick question but one posed out of curiosity. Halloween is after all a bewitching night in which alter egos and role playing is the force majeure. And we do live in a “me too” society. So why not?

On the other side of the coin does the magic and excitment of the day still allow you to forget your adult role as parent and allow you to momentarily enjoy bobbing for apples, greeting boisterous  and costumed children at your front door and “pretend” to be frightened by their colorful costumes?

The day has become only overly commercialized. The cost of elaborate costumes and the candy itself at times might require you to take on a second or third mortgage.

Pumpkins disguised as jack-o-lanterns are visible in many windows and special non alcoholic pumpkin and spice lattes grace many a party table.

Children still enjoy the challenge of seeing who in their group will collect the most candy and of course parents handing out the goodies to young trick or treaters still sample a few of the mini  candy bars and other treats they bought for the youngsters.

To me Halloween is a therapeutic day in which folks don a costume that allows them to forget who they are and dive headlong into an alter ego if only for a few hours of fun and adventure.

Happy Halloween to one and all.

 

Word Prompt Halloween

 

 

 

 

 

4 comments

  1. Halloween was not a festivity in the UK until around the seventies. By then I was an adult with children and simply saw it as an American thing and nothing to do with us. Therefore it’s hardly surprising I see it as commercialism at its worst. We did host good parties for our children and occasionally took them out. We never have anyone at our door, a country lane without street lights is not a place anyone wants to visit on Halloween!
    I loved your article though and can understand long held traditions. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Susan. In the good ole days trick or treating on Halloween was an innocent pastime perpetrated on a complaint public with children of their own. It was in effect a “quid pro quo” in which many folks felt the need to return the favor of doling out goodies to masked marauders. These days the commercial aspect of the day has gone ballistic and there is a hollow sincerity to the day’s true spirit. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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